Moral distress in health care — Special report outlines strategies to increase moral resilience

From www.eurekalert.com

Wolters Kluwer Health

February 14, 2017 - Nurses in all roles and specialties face complex ethical situations that challenge their values, giving rise to moral distress. New approaches to overcoming the challenges of moral distress by increasing moral resilience are presented in a supplement to the February issue of the American Journal of Nursing. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Based on the proceedings of a recent expert symposium, the special report outlines strategies to mitigate the harmful effects of moral distress in the health care workforce and to create healthy work environments--with the goal of providing safe, high-quality care for patients and families. The supplement, titled "State of the Science: Transforming Moral Distress into Moral Resilience in Nursing," is now available on AJN's website. Cynda Hylton Rushton, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Kathy Schoonover-Shoffner, PhD, RN, are the guest editors of the special report.

Addressing Moral Distress by Building Moral Resilience

Moral distress occurs when nurses and others "recognize their responsibility to respond to care situations but are unable to translate their moral choices into action." For example, an oncology nurse may know that a cancer patient wishes to refuse treatment, but doesn't do so because his physician and family want him to "fight on"; or nurses on a geriatric unit may know they are not providing needed care to patients because of poor staffing.

To see entire article click https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-02/wkh-mdi021417.php

 

Comments are closed.